Graduate Degrees in Engineering

What Goes Into a Graduate Engineering Degree Program?

Engineering is not all about crunching numbers, though that does play a big part of the profession. Those who desire to get into engineering must have, in addition to mathematical prowess, curiosity about how things work and a knack for solving problems. All in all, engineers must possess creativity. Some popular engineering majors for graduate-level programs are aerospace engineering, civil engineering, chemical engineering, environmental engineering, and petroleum engineering. While all engineering students will take in-depth classes in mathematics, physics, and communication skills, the students' other classes will depend on their specific path of study. For example, a student who is earning a graduate engineering degree in aerospace engineering will take classes in aerodynamics, flight propulsion, and other related topics. On the other hand, a student who is earning a graduate engineering degree in medical engineering will take classes in medical terminology, chemical reactions, and other related topics. Most engineering students will be required to complete an internship before they may graduate as a means to ensure that all graduates will have at least some professional working experience. In addition, many students will be required to complete an intensive project prior to graduation that tests their engineering knowledge and skill.

What Jobs Can Graduate Engineering Degree Holders Get?

The types of jobs that engineering degree holders can get depend on the field of study they pursued while in graduate school. Most engineering graduates work directly in the field they studied. For example, those who earned a master's or doctoral degree in petroleum engineering will work with petroleum companies or the government to develop new fuel resources as well as work in making current resources more efficient. On the other hand, those who earned a master's or doctoral degree in environmental engineering will work with businesses or the government to develop regulations for environmental protection as well as handle the cleanup and restoration of previously polluted sites. Nearly all engineering industries are projected to do well into the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). For example, petroleum engineers will see an 18% increase in employment opportunities during the 2008-18 decade, the BLS asserts. The only engineering industry that is projected to experience a decline in job opportunities is chemical engineering, so keep that in mind when deciding what field to earn your degree in.

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